Jason,

Lummi Nation

As a working adult with children, “on-campus” learning proved to be challenging as Jason struggled to juggle family, work and school. Fortunately, because he was able to use his scholarship to help cover tuition, he was able to move his family from a rural area with no high-speed internet access to an area with much better network access and speeds. “It made online learning a real possibility for me.”

“The scholarship was a game changer in every way, I was even able to cut back on some work days to focus on school work, which made a huge difference for me and my family.”

Jason cares deeply about his community, the Lummi Nation, and their ever-threatened way of life. His deep-seated commitment to fighting for his people’s rights fuels Jason every day and has motivated him to finish his degree so he may continue on to law school and defend the rights of his community through the support of the law.

Cooking with Ironwood

Recipe

Cooking with Ironwood

Student:
Jason

What I would like to share is not necessarily a recipe, but more of a way to cook a food.

On our reservation there is a tree we call ironwood. Ironwood is very fire retardant. It is the perfect cooking tool for our number one source of food, salmon. For generations and generations our people have used ironwood to cook our barbequed salmon. It is not uncommon for our families to pass down ironwood barbeque sets to the next generation.

Cooking fish on a stick is very simple. All you need is salmon, the ironwood, and a fire. It doesn’t take long to cook salmon over the fire; 30-45 minutes is ideal cooking time for the salmon.

Where the Sidewalk Ends the poems and drawings of Shel Silverstein

Book

Where the Sidewalk Ends the poems and drawings of Shel Silverstein

Student:
Jason

This book means so much to me because it takes me back to my childhood and reminds me of the passion I have for my education and reading. It was actually this book that was my inspiration to go back to school. The stories gave me that extra push I needed to get back to it and work toward my degree. Now all my children have a copy of it too.

Music: The Snotty Nose Rez Kids

Arts & Entertainment

Music: The Snotty Nose Rez Kids

Student:
Jason

The Snotty Nose Rez Kids are a hip-hop duo from British Columbia. Even though they are from Canada, they tear down the imaginary border between the United States and Canadian indigenous people of the Pacific Northwest. What I love about the SNRK is their ability to keep their ties to the culture in their music. Hip-Hop is not a traditional form of music for us as Native People, but it can serve as a voice for us to be heard. Maintaining who you are and how you live is very prevalent in the Snotty Nose Rez Kids music. Being proud of who you are and not being what you are not is one of the strong messages that their music carries.

“we speak back to the stereotypes that present us as untamed, ill-mannered and vulgar savages, reclaiming ourselves as the 7th generation on the rise.”

https://snottynoserezkids.com/

Eighth Generation

Native Owned Business

Eighth Generation

Student:
Jason

Eighth Generation is a Native owned and operated company in Seattle. What I love about Eighth Generation is the opportunity they create for Native artists. The demand for handmade cultural art is here, we just need more people or businesses like them to facilitate the connection between supply and demand. They give Native artists that opportunity to showcase and sell their works of art.

https://eighthgeneration.com/

Billy Frank Jr.

Native & Non-Native Leader

Billy Frank Jr.

Student:
Jason

One of my greatest inspirations is the late Billy Frank Jr., who was an advocate for Indian Treaty Rights and Environmental Stewardship. From 1945 into the 1960s, he was arrested over 50 times for fishing in our ancestral waters, which is something our ancestors had been doing for generations. The state of Washington was trying to deny Billy and his traditional way of life. But in 1974 in United States v. Washington, 384 F. Supp. 312, Judge Hugo Boldt upheld the government’s treaty with the Native people of the Pacific Northwest, which stated that tribes who signed the Point Elliott Treaty were allowed to fish on their ‘usual and accustomed grounds.’ Billy Frank Jr.’s fight is inspiring to me because it shows that our way of life will not go away. We have been here for generations and we intend to keep our way of life alive, no matter what. Billy Frank Jr.’s fight for our treaty rights is one of the main reasons I intend on attending law school once I complete my undergrad.

Lolita

Social Issue

Lolita

Student:
Jason

Lolita (or Sk’aliCh’elh-tenaut in traditional Lummi), is an orca whale that lives in the Miami Aquarium. She is from the Pacific Northwest originally, but she was captured from Penn Cove, Washington, and taken to the aquarium over 40 years ago. Our tribe has been in an ongoing fight with the aquarium to release Lolita back into her home waters. The orca is a very powerful being in the water, and Lolita is an extension of our family. It is our duty, as the protectors of the sea, to take care of all its residents, so Lummi Nation will continue to fight for all that live and thrive on the water, including Lolita.

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