Alana,

Lakota Nation

“We’re losing our language at an alarming rate. You rarely, if ever, hear young people speaking our language.”

Alana knows that education holds the key to her long-term success, especially if she’s going to preserve her people’s legacy and Lakota language. Spurred on by tribal elders, Alana is working to establish immersive language nests where young children can start learning Lakota even before their formal education begins.

Alana recognizes the importance of one’s identity and an education when setting up children for success at an early age. A lot of kids in her community got involved with drinking and drug use and she witnessed the devastation firsthand.

“Our very identity as a people depends on preserving our language, and I’m determined to make that happen.” The educational opportunities offered through the College Fund have opened doors for Alana and set her on a path—a path others can follow.

Gabooboo Bread

Recipe

Gabooboo Bread

Student:
Alana

This recipe is always nice for me because I would wake up in the summer and my mom would be on a mission to make this bread! She’d have our whole kitchen covered in bowls, cans, and powder. I’d watch her make it, and it always looked like it took so much work and time, but it actually wasn’t that complicated. When we eat gabooboo bread we usually put butter and jam on it and then eat it with beef stew.

Ingredients

  • 4 cups flour
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 2 eggs
  • ½ can milk
  • ½ cup of water

Instructions

  • Mix
  • Put a hole in the middle of the powder
  • Add 2 eggs
  • ½ can of milk
  • ½ cup of water, if it’s too thick add more water

Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl

Book

Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl

Student:
Alana

Anne Frank’s diary left a mark on me. In a way, it helped me realize my own identity, because I was about the same age as her when I read it. Even though our lives were completely different, it made me re-evaluate how I reacted or how I treated situations. Because she was so mature at 13, she had to be, and she had no idea what an impact she was going to leave on the world. It gave me the perspective and inspiration I needed growing up.

Entertainment: Powwows

Arts & Entertainment

Entertainment: Powwows

Student:
Alana

I dance at powwows every year and there’s so much that goes into it. It’s such a fun experience for all ages. They really do have something for everyone. You can dance, observe, play the drums, shop, etc. They’re such a powerful way to feel connected to our roots and help us preserve our culture. I’ve been going to them since I was a child, and it was really those experiences and the way they made me feel, that made me want to pursue a degree in Native American studies. I want to help preserve our language and culture for generations, and powwows are such a fun way to do that.

Red Berry Woman

Native Owned Business

Red Berry Woman

Student:
Alana

The Red Berry Woman is a Hidatsa, Dakota Sioux, and an Aissiniboine woman who makes ribbon skirts, shirts, dresses, and other Native products—pretty much anything you can add a ribbon to. Her products are so beautiful and creative, she’s even participated in New York Fashion Week and Paris Fashion week. I think it’s so inspiring that she’s opening so many doors for Native fashion and making other people appreciate and admire it as well.

https://redberrywoman.com/

Sunshine Carlow

Native & Non-Native Leader

Sunshine Carlow

Student:
Alana

I look up to Sunshine Carlow because she is a Native leader who is doing a lot for the Lakota language revitalization. I was her intern at Dakota Lakota Summer Institute and I admired her positivity and confidence. She always seemed to know exactly what to say. Someday, I hope to help the Lakota language and community as much as she has, starting with our youth.

Learn More

MMIW: Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women

Social Issue

MMIW: Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women

Student:
Alana

Missing and murdered indigenous women are becoming more and more prevalent in today’s society. Women are scared to go anywhere alone and more and more social posts like, “If I ever go missing, just know that I didn’t want to leave,” are being shared. It’s scary to think that as an indigenous woman, I have a target on my back. My hope is that with this issue becoming more prevalent, we’ll all come together to protect each other. It’s up to all of us to make our communities feel safe again.

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AT&T is proud to be a long-time collaborator with the College Fund on initiatives that enhance the quality of life for Native youth and create the leaders and workforce of tomorrow. Our work with the College Fund allows us to continue to support and connect Native American communities and build a diverse pipeline of tech talent.

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