Student Books

Add our Native scholars’ favorite books to your reading list.

Where the Sidewalk Ends the poems and drawings of Shel Silverstein

Where the Sidewalk Ends the poems and drawings of Shel Silverstein

Student:
Jason

This book means so much to me because it takes me back to my childhood and reminds me of the passion I have for my education and reading. It was actually this book that was my inspiration to go back to school. The stories gave me that extra push I needed to get back to it and work toward my degree. Now all my children have a copy of it too.

Stone Fox by John Reynolds Gardiner

Stone Fox by John Reynolds Gardiner

Student:
Brandon

Stone Fox was one of the first chapter books I read as a child. It tells a story about a young Alaskan boy who enters a dog sled race in order to save his grandfather’s life and his family’s farm. The story taught me at a young age to always persevere. Sometimes it may feel like the odds are stacked against you, but you really can overcome anything if you set your mind to it.

Island of the Blue Dolphins, by Scott O’Dell

Island of the Blue Dolphins, by Scott O’Dell

Student:
Autumn

I stumbled upon Island of the Blue Dolphins at the library one day in fourth grade. It hadn’t been that long since we moved off the reservation and away from other Native children like me, which was hard. This book really hit home with me, because the main character was so much like me—lost in an unfamiliar world. It was filled with so much emotion and adventure, but it was also about survival and never giving up. As the years went by, I never forgot about it and today I’ve even shared it with my children.

The Phantom Prince, My Life with Ted Bundy by Elizabeth Kendall

The Phantom Prince, My Life with Ted Bundy by Elizabeth Kendall

Student:
Taylor

After watching a Netflix series in regard to a notorious serial killer, Ted Bundy, I was shocked but also intrigued. I wanted to read the book the series was based on. The Phantom Prince, My Life with Ted Bundy by Elizabeth Kendall was published in 1981 and turned into a screenplay by Michael Werwie, which then became the Netflix series, “Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Vile, and Evil.” The book unveiled the chilling timeline Elizabeth Kendall endured throughout her relationship with Ted Bundy. The book was a horrifying read as I was reminded of the gruesome attacks these women faced, and the manipulation tactics he used on his own girlfriend.

I recommend this page-turner because the book is written from the perspective of a serial killer’s girlfriend that will keep you fascinated until the very end. The book was so spellbinding it led me to a movement that affects me directly. Missing and murdered women is an epidemic that women still very much face today. In fact, as a Native American woman, according to the U.S. Department of Justice, I am 10 times more likely to be murdered. This statistic alone is enough to send chills down my spine. This statistic led me to The Coalition to Stop Violence Against Native Women. The CSVANW is a coalition that advocates for social change in our communities. They strive to bring awareness to the issues Native American women face in hopes of stopping the violence. As an indigenous woman, I urge everyone to spread the word of CSVANW to help break the cycles of violence in indigenous communities. No one should have to face the horrors Elizabeth Kendall or any of the victims of Mr. Bundy have faced. The CSVANW is a great starting point for creating change. To find more information or see how you can get involved visit their website at https://www.csvanw.org/what-we-do/.

Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl

Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl

Student:
Alana

Anne Frank’s diary left a mark on me. In a way, it helped me realize my own identity, because I was about the same age as her when I read it. Even though our lives were completely different, it made me re-evaluate how I reacted or how I treated situations. Because she was so mature at 13, she had to be, and she had no idea what an impact she was going to leave on the world. It gave me the perspective and inspiration I needed growing up.

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